LAW, ALGORITHMS, AND JUSTICE
(LAWP-4050) - 2 UNITS

Algorithms and machine learning are rapidly transforming both civil and criminal legal systems. These tools have supplanted human decision makers to determine where police should patrol, who should receive government benefits, how long people should be incarcerated, and who should be investigated for child neglect or abuse, among other examples. The hope is that modern computational and statistical methods can increase the accuracy and efficiency of legal decision-making while reducing human bias and error. The concern is that these tools can be unaccountable "black boxes" that reproduce bias and erode personal privacy, all while concealing these harms behind a mask of scientific objectivity.

Pass/Fail:
No

Prerequisites:
None